How to make a Rose using Modelling Paste

How to make a Rose using Modelling Paste


Hi, welcome to Candy’s Cupcakes. Today I’m
going to show you how to create a sugar flower. For this I’m using the Renshaw flower modelling
paste. You can get modelling paste from most supermarkets but it’s not the Renshaw one.
I do prefer the that one though. Here I’ve created a darker pink, pale pink and white, just so
that it creates a nice darker centre of the flower, going out to pale. For now I’m going
to remove those two and put them in a plastic bag so that they don’t dry out. Taking the
darker pink, you want to split it in half. Now it depends on how big you want the rose,
with how big you do this stage. For the centre you want to create a cone shape. I’ve just
used my two fingers and the palm of my hand. If you just want to press it down onto a clean
work surface, so that it’s nice and flat ready to use. With this one you want to make three
petals out of it. Split it into three pieces and taking each piece, roll it into a ball
and then using your finger tips, you want to think it out all the way around, into a
little disc. It doesn’t have to look perfect at the ends because roses are all different
shapes and sizes. But you want to make it nice and thin, especially at one end. And then you want to make each petal roll back, this takes a little bit of practice but if you
roll it back gently with your fingers, so you get a nice point. Just pop it on the side
on the foam mat. You can use any breathable material for the mat but you can get these
from most places and they are just indented so you can put each petal on and they keep
their shape rather than being a flat surface. They are useful for all sorts of little blossoms
and other decorations that you’re making. So just doing the same again with this one,
just create a nice little disc. And roll it back from one corner and roll it back like
that. Put that to one side. Putting it to one side so it just goes a little bit hard,
so it’s ready to stick on and it doesn’t lose that curl you’ve created. With regular fondant
it does, far too quickly, so I wouldn’t suggest using ordinary fondant sugar paste for making
flowers. It’s just not strong enough, it doesn’t go hard enough and the petals quite easily
break… which isn’t good once you’ve attached it to the cake. So there you have the three
for the centre. Take the next colour, so this is the pale
pink. Just give it a little knead, make sure that it’s ready to work with and it’s nice
and soft. Now for this one we want the create five petals. What I tend to do is create one,
which is the centre, and you’ve got three, then the next is five and the next one will
be seven and so on. So for this we will need five. These petals need to be slightly bigger,
but not massively bigger, if there is any access then you can cut it off the flower
at the very end. This is getting quite sticky now. So we’re just doing exactly the same
thing with this. So we’re curling back each corner and we’re allowing it to dry slightly.
We don’t want it to go rock hard otherwise it will just crack when you try to attach
it to the flower. So depending on how experienced you are you might want to do this step by
step and wait for the petals to dry… and then do each one. But if you’re a little bit
faster then carry on like this. Ok, so there’s another one. Before these go too hard, because they are all ready getting a bit that way. What we
now need to do is take some edible glue. So this is just a tiny pinch of tylo powder with
some water and then left for around 10 – 15 minutes. If you take each of the petals that
you made before, turn them over and then brush a little bit of the glue around the bottom
of each petal. The bottom is the un-curled bit, on the other side. and then this is the
tricky bit that you’ll have to practice if you’re not used to doing them. You want to
attached each one. So by attached I mean – hold one corner of the petal to the centre and
take the next one, and you want to tuck it underneath that one, and bend it around at
the same time. And then the final one, underneath that one and that should end going over the
first one. And then if you want to squidge it in at the bottom, to make sure that they
are all nicely glued together. And as you can see it’s forming a nice centre for your
rose. Pop that to one side. While these are still drying we can take the
final one, which is the white. So we’ve done, three, five and then there will be seven.
So I want to create seven bigger petals again. So just thin it out to a nice disc and do
seven of these. So now, if you take the pale ones that we
did before, they gone nice and hard, not too hard. Turn them over and again repeat the process using edible glue. Just brush on the bottom of each one. Now as the get bigger it gets tricky to handle, holding the flower and attaching them. Just take you time and
don’t give up practising. So with this one… as you can see where it overlaps here, that’s
where you want to start the next petal so it looks more natural. So again if you pin
it down on one side, so you can tuck the next one underneath. Now they have to be quite
close together so its a nice full rose. So again it comes with a little bit of experience
really knowing how close to put them. But as you can see… and then keep pressing them
down. Lift up that one, pop that one underneath… holding it down all the while if you can.
And then the final one for this row. Check that it’s nice and secured underneath. And then because they are not rock hard you can still tease them into place in terms of adding a bit more curl where it needs it or manoeuvring them about a little bit. It’s starting to look like a rose. Now I need to wait for these to dry a little longer normally, but for this
we’ll make a start now. So I’ll take the ones that I did first and then go with the softer
one last. Again add the glue… Now you can go bigger and bigger but it does
get more difficult. If you start off so it begins over the overlap… you don’t want
it back to back with each petal. Hold one corner and just keep overlapping them. As
you can see we’ve created a nice ombre effect with the dark pink to white. So it looks quite
pretty on a wedding cake especially. You can leave these over night to dry and then next
day you can use them or whilst they’re still a little bit soft you can add the supports
to the bottom of them. Things like a cocktail stick or wire or whatever you’re using to
secure it to the cake. So again you can tease each petal a little bit. Now for this I tend
to put in in my hand like that, so that it doesn’t fall straight through but the petals
will still be in the right position I want them to be in. You can put them in a cup over
night or I tend to like using these. What I do then is… you find that underneath it
will look a bit ugly, so you can see the centre there. So what you can do is cut that off
with a pair of clean scissors and then if you’re adding it to the side of a cake you
might want to cut the bottom off on an angle so that it’s at a certain position and that
it sits on the cake better. Because otherwise if you’ve got a big chunky thing at the bottom
it’s just going to stick out far too much. So there you go, that’s a sugar rose made
out of flower modelling paste.

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