How to Decorate Cookies with Royal Icing with Bridget Edwards

How to Decorate Cookies with Royal Icing with Bridget Edwards


Hi I’m Bridget Edwards, cookbook author
and creator of the blog “Bake at 350.” I’m here today with Imperial Sugar and
Dixie Crystals to show you how to decorate cookies using royal icing. I’m using Imperial Sugar’s royal icing
recipe which starts with sifting together 4
cups of powdered sugar with 3 tablespoons of dried egg whites. To this we’ll add 2 teaspoons lemon juice and a
1/2 cup of warm water. Use the paddle attachment on your
electric mixer and start on low. Once the sugar is incorporated into the liquid, increase the speed up to medium and set your timer for about 5 minutes. For tinting royal icing you’ll want to use a gel paste food coloring. Gel paste are wonderful
to use with royal icing. They won’t thin out your icing like a liquid food coloring
would, and they also give you nice, rich vibrant
shades. All you do is squeeze a little bit into your icing
and just give it a stir. Once you have your desired shade you want to go ahead and just press a
piece of plastic wrap right down on top of your icing. This will
keep your royal icing from crusting. Now let’s get decorating! Let’s start
with outlining. Outlining is used as a guide for filling
in cookies and it’s also used for piping decorative
details. Hold your icing bag above the cookie at a slight angle and let the icing fall
onto the cookie. When you reach the end, gently just
press down your icing tip while you stop squeezing. Now we’re going to prepare icing for flooding, and flooding is just a fancy term for
thinning your icing with water to fill in your outlines. So we just start by adding water little
by little. You always want to start with the small
amount of water. It’s much easier to add water than is to take it away. And just stir it. You’re looking for your
icing to be about the consistency of glue. When you have the right
consistency, you’ll drop your icing back onto itself and when it disappears on a count of 1,001, 1,002 you’re good to go. To flood your cookies simply use your thin icing and squeeze
onto your cookie. Use a generous amount of icing, but
don’t worry about covering every little bit, it will spread. Once you’ve
covered the cookies with the flood icing, use a toothpick to guide the icing into all the empty spaces and into the corners. To add decorative
details like dots just take a contrasting color of flood
icing and drop dots onto the wet icing. You want to give
the base color a minute or two to set before adding the dots on top. Another
easy decorative detail is to turn those dots into hearts and all you need is a toothpick to do
this. So just drop your dots onto your cookie, and then
take a toothpick and drag that toothpick through the
center of each dot creating heart.s Another popular design
that you can make while using the wet on wet technique is to create lines and marbling. So you want to take a contrasting color icing and for the lines just draw lines
across your icing. It’s as easy as that. Take a toothpick and drag them through your lines, going back and forth. It’s a really simple way to make a cookie
look extra fancy. You can use different tips
to add pretty decorative details to your cookies. You’ll want to use piping consistency icing, and I’m using a star tip to make a decorative border. And you’ll just use a pulsing motion
going along all of the edges on your cookie for really simple, but really pretty
detail. Now we’ll use a leaf tip to add leaves to our strawberry cookies, and you just squeeze and then release
the pressure to make a leaf. Squeeze at the bottom and then release the pressure. You want
to let these cookies dry uncovered for 6 to 8 hours or
overnight. Don’t worry they won’t go stale.

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